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Bringing Fresh, Local Produce to Your Kitchen
2020 Season Announced! — June 3rd - Nov 25th

Community and Sustainability are Important.

When the farm has a successful season members benifit from a great selection of fresh produce, and if disaster strikes the farm is protected from financial ruin by the support of its members.

A CSA share also gives members an intimate attachment to their food; they know where it comes from, how it was produced and by whom, and that they are making an investment in their local economy.

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Frequently Asked Questions
What is a CSA?

Community Supported Agriculture (or CSA) represents a unique relationship between a farm and the local community of people who eat the food it produces. CSA members choose to support a local farm by purchasing a CSA Share, in exchange the farm provides them with fresh local produce throughout the CSA season.

The CSA shareholders provide the capital needed on the farm to get going in the spring, in exchange the farm returns the bounty of their harvest.

What about COVID19 and Social Distancing?

It's too soon to say how long the shut down will require social distancing and impact our operations. We're working with the farm and local governing bodies to develop a game plan; more information will be announced soon. It may mean we need to do contactless delivery or pickup.

How Does It Work?

Each Wednesday our partner farm Blooming Hill Farm packages their organic, seasonal produce into boxes and delivers it to our pickup location at Greenwood Lake Yoga.

You choose as few as 10 weeks or up to every week, and pick up between 2:00pm and 7:00pm.

Bring last week's empty box back, and pick up your new crate and the week's fresh fruits.

Why Not Buy at a Grocery Store?

As a CSA Member you get to choose what agricultural practices you want to support by choosing the farm you get your food from. By selling directly to the people who will eat their food, with no middlemen involved, both farmers and customers get a fair price.

Where Does the Money Go

Directly to the farmer! We add just enough to cover bags, administrative costs (phone service, email/website hosting) and credit card fees.

Pay cash or check for $1 off/week.

Can I Buy Multiple Shares?

Yes!

Can I Buy Half Shares?

Stay tuned, right now we aren't planning on half shares, but with enough interest, we may consider opening up that option.

Why not ask around and share with some friends or neighbors?

What Produce Can I Expect?
Here's what we saw in the 2019 Season
This is just a sampling of some of the produce that you might expect by month.
There is no guarantee of quantities or types of veggies in any given season.
July 2019
  • Cabbage
  • Kale
  • Radishes
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Heirloom Lettuce
  • Purslane
  • Zucchini
  • Green Beans
  • Garlic
  • Fennel
  • Basil
  • Wild Spinach
  • Garlic Scapes
  • Sweet Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Roasting Onions
  • Chives
  • Onion
  • Sugar Snap Peas
  • Parsley
  • Fava Beans
  • Blueberries
August 2019
  • Heirloom Lettuce
  • Kale
  • Cucumbers
  • Beets
  • Corn
  • Chives
  • Carrots
  • Onions
  • Eggplant
  • Zucchini
  • Summer Squash (yellow & green)
  • Garlic
  • Cilantro
  • Jalapeno peppers
  • Sunflower Sprouts
  • Watercress
  • Horn of the Bull Peppers
  • Potatoes
  • Parsley
  • Tomatoes
  • Tomatillos
  • Peaches
September 2019
  • Mixed lettuce
  • Eggplant
  • Radishes
  • Garlic
  • Tomatoes
  • Green beans
  • Shishito peppers
  • Kohlrabi
  • Corn
  • Lemon Verbena
  • Horn of the bull peppers
  • Mixed root vegetables
  • Delicata squash
  • Arugula
  • Mint
  • Broccoli Rabe
  • Blue Potatoes
  • Dill
  • Apples
  • Peaches
October 2019
  • Delicata Squash
  • Spaghetti Squash
  • Acorn Squash
  • Honeynut Squash
  • Butternut Squash
  • Kabocha Squash
  • Scarlet turnip
  • Lettuce
  • Toscano Kale
  • Carrots
  • Broccoli
  • Parsley
  • Spinach
  • Radish
  • Garlic
  • Radicchio
  • Mixed color carrots
  • Rutabaga
  • Tomatoes (Roma)
  • Beets
  • Dill
  • Napa Cabbage
  • Pumpkin
  • Apples
  • Pears
November 2019
  • Carrots
  • Beets
  • Butternut Squash
  • Spinach
  • Daikon radish
  • Garlic
  • Rosemary
  • Parsley
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Yukon gold potatoes
  • Red potatoes
  • Purple top turnips
  • Spinach
  • green kohlrabi
  • watermelon radishes
  • Jerusalem artichokes
  • Acorn squash
  • Green curly kale
  • Cilantro
  • Russet Potatoes
  • Quince
  • Delicata squash
  • Mesclun salad mix
  • Black spanish radish
  • Apples
Blooming Hill Farm
Monroe, NY
 

Guy Jones started farming in the Hudson Valley in the early eighties, not long after he gave up his storefront law office in Albany, New York. In the beginning, Blooming Hill sold vegetables at farmers' markets locally and in New York City at the Union Square Greenmarket.

Even back in the 80's the farm still grew a very wide variety of specialty organic produce - some of it strange and new even for the burgeoning New York restaurant scene. This attracted the attention of up and coming chefs such as David Bouley, Mario Batali, Tom Colicchio and Michael Romano. These would-be restaurateurs began picking up produce from the farm's Greenmarket stand on a regular basis.

Other chefs caught wind of this and began requesting that the farm try growing unique crops from then hard to obtain imported seeds. The farm answered these requests and the word began to spread. Before long Blooming Hill had a small but loyal group of wholesale customers, and was delivering weekly to restaurants in New York and the surrounding area.

Today Blooming Hill is still known for their unaltered, eclectic and broad produce offerings - they grow and forage over 200 varieties of fruits and vegetables on a hundred acres in Orange County, NY, and are proud to sell to some of the best restaurants in New York City, New Jersey, and the Hudson Valley.

https://www.bloominghill.farm/